260120 Timing Carbohydrate and Protein Intake by Danny M. O’Dell MA., CSCS

260120 Timing Carbohydrate and Protein Intake

By Danny M. O’Dell, M.A. CSCS

The amount and timing of these critical macronutrients affects the overall testosterone that will bind to the androgen receptors within the body. This increased binding is called ‘up regulation’ which means there is a larger amount of receptors that are responsive to the testosterone circulating.

Testosterone is one of the major hormonal signals of expanded protein synthesis in the muscle. Without protein synthesis there would be no strength gain or added growth. This testosterone, in order to be useful, must be bound to a receptor before it can send the signal to the DNA apparatus to make the necessary structural changes. Studies conducted in the recent past have shown that with nutrient intake the circulating testosterone decreases. Which in all likelihood means the hormone is being attached where it’s needed.

Additionally, it has been determined that 25-50g of protein (essential amino acids) taken in conjunction with 50g of carbohydrate before and after within 10 minutes of the completion of the exercise session is highly beneficial to growth. This causes an increase in the amount of circulating insulin in the blood stream. Insulin stimulates the uptake of amino acids into the muscle tissue.

Growth hormone (originating from the anterior pituitary gland) and the insulin like growth factor 1, from the liver create additional uptakes of amino acids after a workout.

Timing of the intake of these macronutrients is crucial for optimizing muscle tissue growth in the human body.

The bottom line appears to be that 25-50g of protein (essential amino acids) taken in conjunction with 50g of carbohydrate before and within 10 minutes after of the completion of the exercise session is highly beneficial to growth.

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